7 Newsletter Content Ideas For Psychotherapy Practices

Newsletter content ideas for psychotherapy private practices

Ok.

So email lists are really important.

Like so important that some people would say that your business might as well not exist online if it isn’t growing a list.

I don’t know if I would take it that far but I do agree that lists are really important.

You can do many things on your website to build trust with your website visitors. You can have well-written copy, professional design, a blog so that visitors can get to know you. You can have photos of yourself that show how friendly and approachable you are. You can even have an intro video.

But in many cases, a first-time website visitor will not read your website and call you right then.

A potential client will need to have more points of contact with you. They may need to visit your website a few times. They may need to see you pop up in their social media feed with a useful article. Or they may need to get a few emails from you in their inbox giving out information that really speaks to them.

This is the strength of email lists, you build a relationship beyond your website. Those on your email list gave you the permission to communicate with them through their email. What an honor and awesome opportunity.

Newsletter Content Ideas

Having an email list and sending out a newsletter sounds awesome. We all want the result of having a successful email list: more clients. But sometimes it’s hard to know exactly what we should be putting in those emails.

Here are some ideas

1. Extra post

Newsletters and blogs are different types of content marketing. However, the same sort of content that you put into a blog post, you can also put in an email. What are your subscribers struggling with? What type of information can help them? Answers to these questions are the types of topics you could write about in an extra post email: make it inspiring, educational, or entertaining.

2. Positive Reminder

My friend Kristin Lajeunesse was writing a newsletter she called “Love Yourself Sunday.” Every Sunday, she would send out 4-5 sentences to remind list subscribers to love themselves. It was like having that bestie who calls you once a week and makes sure you’re doing ok and reminds you that you’re worthy of your own love.

I love that friend don’t you? This idea is simple, quick, and made her subscribers feel awesome about themselves. Here are a few spins off of this idea: “Find Calm Friday”, “Mindfulness Monday”, “Reconnect Tuesday”, “De-stress Wednesday”

3. Inspirational words or images

There are so many great sources for life and emotional inspiration. And you, as a healing professional, have so much more expertise on where to find such inspiration. It’s almost wrong of you not to share.

Why not share an excerpt from something that you find fascinating? Or a quote from the leading EFT expert and break it down for us? How would such inspiration look if it was a photograph? Share the photo too. Or even combine words and images.

4. Link round ups

Consider doing a link roundup: sharing links to stories, news items, and resources that your niche clients would find valuable. You can think of it like being an editor of a magazine and the entire internet is from where you can find your content. For an example of a link roundup, I do link roundups in my blog every month.

Link roundups work because we all have limited time. Expertly curated links delivered to our inboxes is so convenient. Find and send all the helpful things and demonstrate your expertise and empathy.

5. FAQ

Take all of that work you did on developing an awesome FAQ page and re-purpose some questions into a series of emails. Choose the questions that are client-focused, giving answers that solve the barriers people have to getting help.

6. Ask the therapist column

Create a column where you invite subscribers to submit questions that you answer only in your newsletter. It creates a type of exclusive access to your advice as well as exposing your subscribers to how you approach healing. Win win for all involved.

7. Blog excerpt and “Click to read more” button

One of the cardinal sins of email marketing to overdo the self-promotion. But done only occasionally and framed in a way that is helpful instead of self-centered can also provide the value that your subscribers are looking for. A good way to approach this would be to share an excerpt from a helpful blog post and make a button that links to the full blog post on your website. You could also do a weekly or monthly digest of several posts which would allow your readers to find blog posts they like quickly. Accompanied by the blog post link, readers can then click through to the post that sounds the most interesting.

Newsletters Build Relationships

Newsletters are a great way to build relationships beyond the time that your website visitors spend on your website. However, once you have subscribers on list, you need to provide value to keep them subscribed.

These newsletter content ideas are just enough to get you started. The ratio to live by is 90% informational or helpful and 10% promotional. All of the above listed ideas give you ways to include helping in your newsletter content but staying mindful of this ratio can keep you on track to newsletter content success.

And if you are ever in doubt, just ask for feedback. Find a friend, colleague, or friendly professional that would be willing to read some of your emails and see what they think.

What are you putting into your newsletters? Have you gotten a better response from certain types of content vs. other types? What’s working for you?

I would love to know how you are doing with your email marketing. You can tweet me or drop me a note anytime. I would love to hear from you.

About Kat Love

Hi, I'm Kat! I'm the founder and lead designer here at Empathysites. Therapists helped me heal from childhood sexual abuse so now I help therapists with creating their websites. I write on topics like website design, strategy, and turning website visitors into clients. Reach out anytime if you'd like to say hi. PS. my pronouns are they/them/their. Thanks.